[sticky entry] Sticky: About me

Sun, Jan. 27th, 2019 14:11
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
The basics:

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The blog:

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The fandoms:

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Subscription/access/commenting policy:

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A note on languages and how I comment:

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Comments on this entry will be screened, so you can ask me anything or introduce yourself in private if you want!

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Tue, Jan. 29th, 2019 23:37
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
This has been a welcome and hilarious distraction today:

Kelsey Impicciche plays the Sims 4 100-baby challenge

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Thu, Jan. 24th, 2019 22:28
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
Just finished season 3 of Outlander, and … well, that ended with a lot more racism than I'd hoped. 

One of the things I like best about the show is how, at least so far, they set up all the pieces for four or five episodes, then there's some decent development in the middle, and then it all comes together in the final act, like so many dominos tipping over. 

One of the things I like least is that, because there's so much ground to cover, instead of fleshing out a character or a plot point we often only get a quick visual or verbal shorthand that we're meant to take at face value. This works sometimes; other times it feels like the writers of the show paper over the complexity of the novels with some lowest common denominator-type stuff. At least I assume that there is more complexity in the novels, and we do get glimpses of it in the show as well. To be fair, though, adapting these novels must be an impossible task. 

So season 3 was a bit more scattered, even larger in scope, and managed to draw some plot lines together quite nicely. Geillis returns! Geillis exits pursued by a protective mama bear! Brianna is a babe of historical importance! (I mean, look at her.)

Before diving into season 4 I'll definitely want to be caught up on the relevant books. 

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Sun, Jan. 20th, 2019 09:30
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
I urgently need to find my sewing kit – my winter coat is still missing an essential button, and today we woke up to -4 °C and frost on the living room window. 
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
A classic autistic Catch-22 is that when you can explain yourself in a calm and friendly manner, mustering all the social skills you've painstakingly acquired, you have already disproven to anyone listening that you are, in fact, autistic. 

By doing the very thing that's most expected of you – adapting to neurotypical standards of behaviour – you lay the groundwork to be disbelieved and belittled in almost all future interactions in which your autism becomes relevant. 

This is just one of the issues with framing autism as a purely, or primarily, social disability. 


Edit: Related, via [personal profile] kaberett: "undiagnosable autism"
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
[personal profile] timetobegin's Screencap Guide

Jayme Closs: Man, 21, named in kidnapping and murder case

The Art of the Pan: What's the Point of a Bad Review in 2019?
  — This article pulls many different opinions and approaches together quite elegantly. The various links to scathing takedowns are a nice bonus, particularly this one about Transparent creator Jill Soloway's memoir. I only wish the titular question was answered more fully instead of mostly being a clickbait headline – with the last few lines, the writer neatly side-steps the issue. 

Speaking of bad reviews: I tried watching a show called Frequency, and about 15 minutes in they unironically used "Wonderwall" to illustrate a plot point set in the 90's. It wasn't even 1995 but a full year later or so. I couldn't take it seriously anymore after that. If you're going to be that lazy picking the music for your TV series, it tells me everything I need to know about the quality of your writing choices. Indeed, the pilot's focus soon shifted, setting up a storyline to redeem the father figure with the main female character only a prop in her father's story. No, thank you. 

Maybe Oasis are giving out "Wonderwall" for free at this point? It must be so widely licensed and sold that it amounts to the same thing. 
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
It will be a few more days before I can watch more Outlander – we've burned through all of season 2 over the past week, pretty much – and I needed something to read for my travels tomorrow. I've tried fic, but AO3 didn't have much to offer that scratched my particular itch and wouldn't contain spoilers. Obviously, the reasonable thing to do was to get all the relevant books to read on my phone. 

"You can start with book three now," said Reason. 

"But what if they made changes when adapting the book? Clearly I need to read book two first to find out – and to get a feel for this version of the characters!" said my Inner Obsessive Completionist. 

"Book three will do!" insisted Reason, fighting a losing battle much like the Jacobites at Culloden

Reading the first chapter of book two was like a soothing cup of tea for the soul. 19 hrs 7 mins left in book, the app helpfully informed me. 

"What if … what if I started book one as well? Just to see what it's like? It can't hurt, can it?" My Inner Obsessive Completionist's eyes were bright with hope. 

17 hrs 43 mins left in book, the app tells me now, halfway into yet another first chapter. 

This is my life now. 

I remember reading the first book years ago – and by years I mean a decade and a half, or more. So long ago that I don't seem to have it among my records of books I've read. I remember being so horrified and so emotionally devastated by a specific scene towards the end of the novel that when I'd finished the book I just put it away and never read another word by the author. It was like she'd broken some unspoken contract of trust with me, the reader.

It's interesting to see how things come circling back around. I've always had a soft spot for stories of time travel. 

More DW stuff

Thu, Dec. 27th, 2018 23:34
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
(I am very, very slowly coming around to DW as a valid abbreviation for Dreamwidth and not just Doctor Who. Bear with me…)

Via [personal profile] muccamukk[personal profile] potofsoup's Dreamwidth how-to, which is an amazing help for so many little details of this website. I thought I knew most of the ins and outs by now – turns out there is still a lot more to learn. (Cut tags can be opened without clicking through to a new page! Still blows my mind.)

And then, via [personal profile] potofsoup, Denise's comment on how Dreamwidth is run and the philosophy behind it. Mainly linking it here so I can find it again when I try to convince others to join this beautiful little only slightly overgrown neck of the woods. 
aeonwren: This icon is taken from a comic book panel. It shows a person with short black hair, white skin and dark red lips, looking directly at the viewer. Their head is tilted forward, giving the impression that they are watching you very carefully, perhaps even seductively. (Default)
Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente
 
So this book. This fucking book. I've been following Valente ever since I read "Silently and Very Fast", and yet. And yet. It's hard to write about a book this masterful and a writer so inventive, so completely in command of her craft. 

Space Opera is about Eurovision in space, with humanity's fate hanging in the balance. The protagonist is a queer brown kid who is now, 25 years on, a washed-out former lead singer of what I took to be this fictional universe's equivalent of Queen. But it's not told completely straight-forwardly. At this point, Valente just runs rings around the concept of conventional storytelling. She does tell the story, in a mostly linear fashion even, but she also spends delightful chapters just fleshing out the details of this universe, including a massive amount of music-related puns and a ridiculous cast of aliens. 

And one of the great things is: Not only is this book laugh-out-loud funny, it's also socially conscious, and it always, always punches up. It makes you feel less alone in the world. It turns a cat into a viewpoint character and criticises space colonialism. And it proves that the two can and need to go together. It has Clippy, for god's sake, because Valente seems to have read that tumblr post. 

I don't even know. I finished this book on the train, trying hard not to cry. Then I read the liner notes and cried some more. If you like the first few pages at all, you can't go wrong here, really. 
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